Media

 

5:00 p.m. CST

January 13, 2017

 

Barton County Electric Cooperative Ice Storm Update

 

LAMAR, MO — January 13, 2017 5pm CST—At this time Barton County Electric Cooperative has seen ice accumulation on wires and poles but have not experienced outages due to the storm. We continue to be prepared for severe weather. The National Weather Service’s updated ice storm warning is for all of our service territory and is still in effect until noon Sunday (1-15-17).

“We are in ready-mode,” says CEO, Russell McCorkle. “We missed the first wave but we are not out of the woods yet, so members should keep their plans in case power does go out.”

As outages occur, electric cooperatives call the association to request help. The association staff coordinates bringing in crews, equipment and supplies from unaffected parts of the state to lend assistance. We currently have 38 linemen ready to begin working, if the disaster is widespread, cooperatives in other states and contractors also will send help.

As the storm develops and details of any outages become clear, check out our Facebook page and website at www.bartonelectric.com with the latest information. Please report all emergencies and outages by calling 417-682-5636 or 800-286-5636

 

Safety During and After the Storm

 

In the aftermath of a major storm, be aware of hazards presented by downed power lines. If you see a power line on the ground, don't assume that it is insulated. Stay away from the wire and secure the area to keep others away, too. If you discover a low or fallen line, do the following:

  • Consider all wires ENERGIZED and dangerous. Even lines that are de-energized could become energized at any time. A live wire touching the ground can cause electricity to travel through the ground, radiating outward from the contact point. STAY CLEAR!
  • DO NOT attempt to remove a tree limb or other object from a power line. Electricity can travel through limbs, especially when they are wet. When cleaning up after the storm, make absolutely sure that no power lines are near before cutting or trimming damaged trees and removing debris from your property.
  • If a broken power line should fall on your vehicle, stay inside the vehicle. Use your cell phone to call for help. The vehicle can become energized and you are safer remaining inside until help arrives. Things like fences and guardrails can also become energized if a downed power line contacts them. Warn others not to approach or touch the vehicle and have them call for help.

 

Portable Generator Safety

Shock and Electrocution

  • Never attach a generator directly to the electrical system of structure (home, office, trailer, etc.) unless a qualified electrician has properly installed the generator with a transfer switch.
  • Always plug electrical appliances directly into the generator using the manufacturer's supplied cords or extension cords that are grounded (3-pronged). Inspect the cord to make sure they are fully intact and not damaged. Never use frayed or damaged extension cords.
  • Keep a generator dry; do not use it in the rain or in wet conditions. If needed, protect a generator with a canopy.

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

  • Never use a generator indoors or in enclosed spaces such as garages, crawl spaces, and basements.
  • Make sure a generator has three to four feet of clear space on all sides and above it to ensure adequate ventilation.
  • Be cautious when using a generator outdoors to ensure it is not placed near doors, windows, and vents could allow CO to enter and build up in occupied spaces.
  • If you or others show symptoms of CO poisoning—dizziness, headaches, nausea, tiredness—get to fresh air immediately and seek medical attention. Do no re-enter the area until it is determined to be safe by trained and properly equipped personnel.

Fire Hazards

  • Generators become hot while running and remain hot for long periods after they are stopped. Generator fuels (gasoline, kerosene, etc.) can ignite when spilled on hot engine parts.
  • Before refueling, shut down the generator and allow it to cool.
  • Gasoline and other generator fuels should be stored and transported in approved containers that are properly designed and marked for their contents, and vented.
  • Keep fuel containers away from flame producing and heat generating devices (such as the generator itself, water heaters, cigarettes, lighters, and matches). Do not smoke around fuel containers    

 

 

10:00 a.m. CST

January 13, 2017

 

 

Barton County Electric Cooperative Ice Storm Update

 

LAMAR, MO — January 13, 2017—10am CST

Key personnel from electric cooperatives in Missouri received another weather update from the National Weather Service Springfield office Friday morning as ice began to accumulate around the state. This was an update from another conference call held Thursday.

According to Doug Cramer with the National Weather Service, conditions will be slightly better than previously anticipated. “That is good news for you,” he told the electric cooperatives.

He also said wind gusts will be lighter than in previous ice storms, with sustained wind speeds below 10 mph. Wind is a major factor in causing power outages. Also out of the forecast is a flood risk previously expected, with total precipitation below 2 inches.

As of 8 a.m. Friday morning, the freezing line had just passed through Springfield and was moving north. Freezing rain was accumulating, but Cramer said it was not building up efficiently due to higher temperatures.

He said the bullseye for the storm appears to be headed to Butler, headquarters for Osage Valley Electric Cooperative. That area is expected to get up to 3/4 of an inch of ice, with the heaviest buildup occurring on Saturday afternoon and evening, January 14.

For Barton County Electric Cooperative based in Lamar, today will be the critical period, Cramer said. The storm won’t cause problems for north Missouri until Sunday, with temperatures not warming up above freezing on Monday.

Elsewhere, the electric cooperatives along the Interstate 44 corridor and central Missouri can expect from 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch of ice beginning today. The ice line extends from Highway 60 in southern Missouri north to the Iowa line, where ice fall is expected to be 1/4 inch or less.

Missouri’s electric cooperatives have been tracking Winter Storm Jupiter for a week and are prepared to deal with its aftermath. All of the state’s electric cooperatives have enacted their Emergency Response Plans. All trucks and other vehicles are fueled, loaded with materials and are ready to go as needed.

The public is encouraged to prepare for possible extended outages. You can track outages at https://outages.amec.org/outages/maps. Visit our website www.bartonelectric.com and Facebook page for the latest information. You can also follow @MoElectricCoops on Twitter and Mo Electric Coops on Facebook for updates and storm safety tips.

 

Safety During and After the Storm

 

In the aftermath of a major storm, be aware of hazards presented by downed power lines. If you see a power line on the ground, don't assume that it is insulated. Stay away from the wire and secure the area to keep others away, too. If you discover a low or fallen line, do the following:

  • Consider all wires ENERGIZED and dangerous. Even lines that are de-energized could become energized at any time. A live wire touching the ground can cause electricity to travel through the ground, radiating outward from the contact point. STAY CLEAR!
  • DO NOT attempt to remove a tree limb or other object from a power line. Electricity can travel through limbs, especially when they are wet. When cleaning up after the storm, make absolutely sure that no power lines are near before cutting or trimming damaged trees and removing debris from your property.
  • If a broken power line should fall on your vehicle, stay inside the vehicle. Use your cell phone to call for help. The vehicle can become energized and you are safer remaining inside until help arrives. Things like fences and guardrails can also become energized if a downed power line contacts them. Warn others not to approach or touch the vehicle and have them call for help.

 

Portable Generator Safety

Shock and Electrocution

  • Never attach a generator directly to the electrical system of structure (home, office, trailer, etc.) unless a qualified electrician has properly installed the generator with a transfer switch.
  • Always plug electrical appliances directly into the generator using the manufacturer's supplied cords or extension cords that are grounded (3-pronged). Inspect the cord to make sure they are fully intact and not damaged. Never use frayed or damaged extension cords.
  • Keep a generator dry; do not use it in the rain or in wet conditions. If needed, protect a generator with a canopy.

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

  • Never use a generator indoors or in enclosed spaces such as garages, crawl spaces, and basements.
  • Make sure a generator has three to four feet of clear space on all sides and above it to ensure adequate ventilation.
  • Be cautious when using a generator outdoors to ensure it is not placed near doors, windows, and vents could allow CO to enter and build up in occupied spaces.
  • If you or others show symptoms of CO poisoning—dizziness, headaches, nausea, tiredness—get to fresh air immediately and seek medical attention. Do no re-enter the area until it is determined to be safe by trained and properly equipped personnel.

Fire Hazards

  • Generators become hot while running and remain hot for long periods after they are stopped. Generator fuels (gasoline, kerosene, etc.) can ignite when spilled on hot engine parts.
  • Before refueling, shut down the generator and allow it to cool.
  • Gasoline and other generator fuels should be stored and transported in approved containers that are properly designed and marked for their contents, and vented.
  • Keep fuel containers away from flame producing and heat generating devices (such as the generator itself, water heaters, cigarettes, lighters, and matches). Do not smoke around fuel containers. 

 

 

5:00 p.m. CST

January 12, 2017

 

 

Barton County Electric Cooperative Ice Storm Update

 

LAMAR, MO — January 12, 2017 5pm CST—With a significant ice storm bearing down on Missouri, Barton County Electric Cooperative is prepared for severe weather. The National Weather Service has issued an ice storm warning for all of our service territory in effect from midnight tonight (1-13-17) to noon Sunday (1-15-17).

“We are preparing for the worst-case scenario, and we’re urging members to do the same,” says CEO, Russell McCorkle. “While the final path of this storm system is still uncertain, there’s no doubt that it’s coming. Damage to electrical distribution system could be scattered or widespread, so members should make plans in case power can’t be restored for several days.”

During a conference call this morning with Doug Cramer of the National Weather Service office in Springfield, Mo., Mr. McCorkle and BCEC staff learned that forecasters are predicting ¾ inch or more of ice that could cause significant outages in the hardest-hit regions. Cooperative members are asked to prepare for outages that could stretch for multiple days until service is restored.

Ice storms are among the most devastating weather events that can hit the electric power supply grid. When ice falls, it can collect on lines. The heavy weight can snap lines, cause trees to fall into lines or topple poles. Crews are also hampered by icy road conditions and downed trees that make travel difficult.

Barton County Electric has considerable experience dealing with winter storms. When large numbers of outages occur, the Emergency Assistance Procedure coordinated by the Association of Missouri Electric Cooperatives in Jefferson City is enacted.

As outages occur, electric cooperatives call the association to request help. The association staff coordinates bringing in crews, equipment and supplies from unaffected parts of the state to lend assistance. We currently have 38 linemen ready to begin working, if the disaster is widespread, cooperatives in other states and contractors also will send help.

As the storm develops and details of any outages become clear, check out our Facebook page and website at www.bartonelectric.com with the latest information. Please report all emergencies and outages by calling 417-682-5636 or 800-286-5636

 

Safety During and After the Storm

 

In the aftermath of a major storm, be aware of hazards presented by downed power lines. If you see a power line on the ground, don't assume that it is insulated. Stay away from the wire and secure the area to keep others away, too. If you discover a low or fallen line, do the following:

  • Consider all wires ENERGIZED and dangerous. Even lines that are de-energized could become energized at any time. A live wire touching the ground can cause electricity to travel through the ground, radiating outward from the contact point. STAY CLEAR!
  • DO NOT attempt to remove a tree limb or other object from a power line. Electricity can travel through limbs, especially when they are wet. When cleaning up after the storm, make absolutely sure that no power lines are near before cutting or trimming damaged trees and removing debris from your property.
  • If a broken power line should fall on your vehicle, stay inside the vehicle. Use your cell phone to call for help. The vehicle can become energized and you are safer remaining inside until help arrives. Things like fences and guardrails can also become energized if a downed power line contacts them. Warn others not to approach or touch the vehicle and have them call for help.

 

Portable Generator Safety

Shock and Electrocution

  • Never attach a generator directly to the electrical system of structure (home, office, trailer, etc.) unless a qualified electrician has properly installed the generator with a transfer switch.
  • Always plug electrical appliances directly into the generator using the manufacturer's supplied cords or extension cords that are grounded (3-pronged). Inspect the cord to make sure they are fully intact and not damaged. Never use frayed or damaged extension cords.
  • Keep a generator dry; do not use it in the rain or in wet conditions. If needed, protect a generator with a canopy.

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

  • Never use a generator indoors or in enclosed spaces such as garages, crawl spaces, and basements.
  • Make sure a generator has three to four feet of clear space on all sides and above it to ensure adequate ventilation.
  • Be cautious when using a generator outdoors to ensure it is not placed near doors, windows, and vents could allow CO to enter and build up in occupied spaces.
  • If you or others show symptoms of CO poisoning—dizziness, headaches, nausea, tiredness—get to fresh air immediately and seek medical attention. Do no re-enter the area until it is determined to be safe by trained and properly equipped personnel.

Fire Hazards

  • Generators become hot while running and remain hot for long periods after they are stopped. Generator fuels (gasoline, kerosene, etc.) can ignite when spilled on hot engine parts.
  • Before refueling, shut down the generator and allow it to cool.
  • Gasoline and other generator fuels should be stored and transported in approved containers that are properly designed and marked for their contents, and vented.
  • Keep fuel containers away from flame producing and heat generating devices (such as the generator itself, water heaters, cigarettes, lighters, and matches). Do not smoke around fuel containers    

 

2:30 p.m. CST

January 11, 2017

Electric co-ops ready for stormy weather

With the potential for severe weather including ice in the forecast, storm teams from electric cooperatives around the state are ready to repair any weather-related damage to power lines that may occur.

When storms threaten, Missouri’s electric cooperatives enact their emergency assistance plan. Through this effort, workers and material from systems out of the storm’s path are quickly sent to the area that needs help the most.

One phone call to the Association of Missouri Electric Cooperatives in Jefferson City will speed help on the way. If necessary, Missouri will call on other states for assistance in order to get members affected by the storm back online as soon as possible. Contractors and tree trimmers will also play a big role and are standing by.

The National Weather Service is calling for the possibility of freezing rain across a wide swath of south and central Missouri beginning on Friday and continuing through the weekend. Electric cooperatives have been tracking the storm for several days. Those systems in harm’s way have trucks loaded with material and all personnel on alert. They are prepared to begin repairs as soon as it is safely possible to work.

All of the state’s electric cooperatives have an emergency plan in place so that every employee knows their role in a crisis situation. After every past storm, these plans have been reviewed at the local and state level. Changes are made to ensure the response improves each time.

Every electric cooperative follows a basic principle when it comes to restoring power — priority goes to the lines that will get the most people back in service the quickest. That means getting transmission lines repaired so that substations are energized, then working outward to the feeder lines and then finally the taps to individual homes.

If outages do occur, follow your electric cooperative’s Facebook page or website for updates on restoration. You can also visit https://outages.amec.org/outages/maps for a look at outages by county or cooperative.

During times of severe weather, safety is important. The public is encouraged to report downed or sagging power lines to the cooperative.

Assume all low and downed lines are energized and dangerous, even if they are not arcing. Never approach a downed power line. If you are in an automobile accident involving a downed power line, stay in the vehicle unless it is on fire.

When the weather is at its worst, our employees are at their best. Rest assured we will get you back online as fast as humanly possible.